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Join the Currie Trees & Treasure Hunt

April 22, 2021

To celebrate World Earth Day, we’re taking the time to appreciate all the beautiful nature that surrounds us in Currie—in particular, we’re celebrating the mature trees that fill our community. With many measured to be over 80 years old, these trees have called this space home since it was a former military base.

“We have made a conscious effort to incorporate trees and greenspaces into the community design for Currie. Trees not only beautify the areas in which they reside, but research has proven that they also have powerful emotional, environmental, health and social benefits for residents.”

– Kelvin Whalen, Senior Director of Real Estate at CLC.

 

Updated May 1, 2021.

Thanks for Joining our Currie Trees & Treasure Hunt – the winner has been contacted via Instagram DM.

Celebrate with us by participating in the Currie Trees and Treasure Hunt! With this contest, we’re encouraging our residents, families and friends to enjoy a day outdoors getting to know our local trees. We’ve given 10 of our big, noteworthy trees nicknames and QR code-enabled signs so you can identify them. Once you find them, you can use the QR code to learn more about their stories and their valuable role in our local community and ecosystem.

By participating in this contest, you have a chance to win a prize supplied by Currie’s newest partner, The Inn on Officers’ Garden, and are guaranteed a wonderful day outdoors enjoying fresh air and exercise.

 

How to Enter the Contest:

  1. Take a photo, video or selfie with any of these 10 named trees growing in the community.
  2. Post your photo to Instagram with the hashtag #CurrieTreesContest and you’ll get one entry.
  3. You can have up to 10 entries by sharing a photo featuring each of our 10 selected trees. Duplicates will not get you extra entries however—each tree you find can only be used once.

The contest starts today, April 22, and you have until April 30 to track down as many trees as you can find. Get outside and enjoy some time with nature!

 

Win a Delicious Prize!

The winner of the contest will win a dinner for two at The Inn on Officers’ Garden and a coupon booklet good for 10 double scoop ice cream treats. The winner will be notified by Instagram DM the week of May 3.

 

Can you find all 10 trees?

We’ve given 10 trees in Currie a unique QR code, which will tell you their names, what kind of tree they are, and a personal story about their life as one of Currie’s original residents. Their names are listed here, but you’ll have to find them yourself to read their stories.

We can’t wait to see your pictures of these lovely trees. Get outside and start searching today!

Large Poplar

Location: Behind Clear Water Academy

Aka the Duchess, this is one of the oldest and biggest trees in Currie. As it is native to Alberta, it thrives and looks so healthy. The Large Poplar also helps with emission reduction by providing shade to the parking lot (even when immobile, cars emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when sitting in the heat).

Lodgepole Pine

Location: Behind some of the first homes and residents in the community and New Heights School and Learning Service

Aka Percy, these trees are native to Alberta and a bit younger than many others in Currie. They have a pretty cool shape – very uncharacteristic for a species that are usually straight-up narrow trees. You may mistake it for a pine such as Mugo Pine

2 Weeping Birches

Age: About 50 years
Location: In front of Althone Hall D2 and The Parade Square

Aka Brenda and Bonnie, these are two of three birches in Currie. Planted to create a symmetrical look, they frame the view from Athlone Hall facing The Parade Square and toward the original Currie Barracks gates by Crowchild Trail. The “weeping” part of the name is because the branches of these birches tend to droop down. These two birches are in decline (dying). But what’s interesting about a dying tree is that it can be alive even when it is dying. Biologically speaking, such a tree invites insects, birds, and fungi to call it home, making it important from an ecological standpoint.

Elm

Location: by the Stables Building D4

Aka Edith, this is one of the oldest trees in Currie. It was planted back in the mid-1930s, around the same time the Stables Building was built. Cavalry and their horses would have found shade and solace under this tree back then. Elms like this one are known for helping increase the value of land, home, and community over time.

Mugo Pine

Age: About 60 years
Location: At the Officers’ Mess Garden

The Officers’ Mess Garden was a gathering place for the officers to meet and have a cigar. Hugo is just one of the many symmetrically planted Mugo Pines that must have made this space even more enjoyable for the officers. Usually, these pines are shrubs maintained in a small ball shape, but here they’ve grown to the size of full-grown trees over the years.

Australian Umbrella Tree

Location: Inside The Inn on Officer’s Garden, formerly the Officer’s Mess Hall J5

Surprisingly, this is not a tree. Aka Cassandra, this indoor house plant has grown so much out of control that it now looks like a tree. Over the years, its roots have spread inside and out. With renovations and an increase in light and attention (like daily watering), this plant is thriving in the sunshine it now gets. The year Cassandra was planted remains a mystery. But we know she was here when Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh visited in 1951.

White Spruce

Age: About 86 years
Location: On Trasimene Heritage Walk leading up to the base commander’s quarters

Aka Captain Blanc, this White Spruce in a row of White Spruce has an intentional design element. Topped, pruned, manicured, and maintained just like a soldier standing at attention before the Commanders Quarters, it’s part of our history and heritage.

Colorado Blue Spruce

Age: About 86 years
Location: Behind the Brad House K3, formerly Base Commander’s garden

This tree is one of the tallest in Currie at about 20 meters in height. The grand tree, aka the Colonel, is centrally located in Alexandria Park and the community overall.  Since this species isn’t native to our region, the big and healthy Colonel is rare and treasured. We’re unsure how this species got here, but we’re glad it did.

Laurel
Leaf Willow

Age: 55+ years
Location: By Airport Playground

Aka Nicholas, this willow is native to Alberta. Its bark is weathered and smooth (the best way to learn about trees is to touch them). An ideal natural asset for a park, the Laurel Leaf provides lots of shade and is great for climbing.

This is a contest facilitated by GD Consulting Canada Inc. and its partners on behalf of Canada Lands Company and the community of Currie. The contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with Instagram. By entering, entrants confirm they are 13+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use. Contest is available to individuals residing in Calgary and the immediate surrounding areas only.

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